Eliminating White Noise

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swinginstyle
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Eliminating White Noise

#1 Post by swinginstyle » Sat Mar 18, 2006 10:49 pm

Could people give me advice on how to eliminate or minimize greatly white noise on some of my recordings?


Thanks,
Kenny
Don't take swing underground!!

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Bob the Builder
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Re: Eliminating White Noise

#2 Post by Bob the Builder » Mon Mar 20, 2006 1:06 am

swinginstyle wrote:Could people give me advice on how to eliminate or minimize greatly white noise on some of my recordings?


Thanks,
Kenny
Is it actually "white noise" you are asking about?
White Noise:

White noise is a sound that contains every frequency within the range of human hearing (generally from 20 hertz to 20 kHz) in equal amounts. Most people perceive this sound as having more high-frequency content than low, but this is not the case. This perception occurs because each successive octave has twice as many frequencies as the one preceding it. For example, from 100 Hz to 200 Hz, there are one hundred discrete frequencies. In the next octave (from 200 Hz to 400 Hz), there are two hundred frequencies.
White noise can be generated on a sound synthesizer. Sound designers can use this sound, with some processing and filtering, to create a multitude of effects such as wind, surf, space whooshes, and rumbles.

Pink noise is a variant of white noise. Pink noise is white noise that has been filtered to reduce the volume at each octave. This is done to compensate for the increase in the number of frequencies per octave. Each octave is reduced by 6 decibels, resulting in a noise sound wave that has equal energy at every octave.
Because white noise covers our entire spectrum you can not filter it out of a recording.
There are however several other forms of noise that can be removed out of a recording to some degree. However it is really, really important to understand that removing noise from a recording will also affect the sound you want to keep.
The more I learn about noise removal the more I realize it is something that should be left up to the professionals. You may be able to get it sounding good on your little head phones, but play it on a large venue system and it will sound very average to really bad.

Brian
Last edited by Bob the Builder on Tue Mar 21, 2006 1:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Mr Awesomer
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Re: Eliminating White Noise

#3 Post by Mr Awesomer » Mon Mar 20, 2006 10:46 am

swinginstyle wrote:Could people give me advice on how to eliminate or minimize greatly white noise on some of my recordings?


Thanks,
Kenny
Stop playing Glenn Miller.
Reuben Brown
Southern California

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Jerry_Jelinek
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#4 Post by Jerry_Jelinek » Mon Mar 20, 2006 2:14 pm

If your speaking of "hiss" in the recording, you need to be very carefull.

Eliminiting the high frequency "hiss" is fairy easy in most sound processing software. But this is usually done by taking a range of frequencies and lower the dBs in the frequency range. But there are also horns and drums in the same frequencies.

You run the risk of reducing the horns and drums also. This can really make the sound very flat and dull. So it is a tricky proposition.

I've gotten in the habit of just leaving the "hiss" in.

Just my 2 cents worth. If you're not talking about "hiss" than you can ignore this posting!!!

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