Of Dizzy and things that go "bop" in the night.

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sonofvu
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Re: Of Dizzy and things that go "bop" in the night

#16 Post by sonofvu » Mon May 24, 2004 10:32 am

Jerry_Jelinek wrote:

The earliest styles of Gillespie and Parker are hardly ever played any longer. For one they are technically very demanding. The styles of bop that Fats Navarro and then Clifford Brown evolved to is still the most copied style of bop playing. When you hear a lot of jazz musicians today play, they are using this later style of bop. It is much easier on the listener.
OK, I'm confused. I thought earlier forms of bebop were close to swing and therefore easier for the listener to connect with the music. I also thought that by the time that Fats Navarro and Clifford Brown came along bop had evolved into hard bop. From your statement above it seems like I have it backwards. It seems like the early stuff was a big departure and that the later stuff was softer and more rounded (to play off of your angular analogy).
Yard work sucks. I would much rather dj.

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#17 Post by mousethief » Thu Jun 03, 2004 9:13 am

Dude, just go to Virgin or BN and preview in the store.

Better yet, follow Paul's advice and find the music geeks in town and ask them. They're in the used music stores.

Kalman
"The cause of reform is hurt, not helped, when an activist makes an idiotic suggestion."

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sonofvu
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#18 Post by sonofvu » Thu Jun 03, 2004 2:21 pm

I got "Bop Lives" and I like it. Especially Coleman Hawkin's "Woody'n You".
Yard work sucks. I would much rather dj.

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Lawrence
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Re: Of Dizzy and things that go "bop" in the night

#19 Post by Lawrence » Fri Jun 04, 2004 5:43 pm

sonofvu wrote:
Jerry_Jelinek wrote:The earliest styles of Gillespie and Parker are hardly ever played any longer. For one they are technically very demanding. The styles of bop that Fats Navarro and then Clifford Brown evolved to is still the most copied style of bop playing. When you hear a lot of jazz musicians today play, they are using this later style of bop. It is much easier on the listener.
OK, I'm confused. I thought earlier forms of bebop were close to swing and therefore easier for the listener to connect with the music. I also thought that by the time that Fats Navarro and Clifford Brown came along bop had evolved into hard bop. From your statement above it seems like I have it backwards. It seems like the early stuff was a big departure and that the later stuff was softer and more rounded (to play off of your angular analogy).
Generalizations always have exceptions, but, generally, yes, that is true. In a sense, the early boppers had something to prove, an axe to grind, and agenda to completely throw away paradigms and radically shake things up. Then as bop methods became more accepted, musicians started re-integrating easy swing rhythms and such. Later musicians brought back a mature subtlety that was somewhat ignored by the early boppers because they were so focused on grabbing a hold of the poweful new bebop engine and taking it out for a power drive, so to speak.
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PhysicsDan
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#20 Post by PhysicsDan » Tue Oct 17, 2006 3:08 pm

If you haven't seen it already:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKZrs6ft4tk

the song is a Parker tune, "Confirmation". It sounds like Bird and Diz to me, but I haven't been able to pin the version down.
In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it's the exact opposite.
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#21 Post by julius » Wed Oct 18, 2006 1:37 pm

Is that really Confirmation? Maybe it's an excerpt from the middle of a version, but I don't hear the head of Confirmation anywhere in the clip.
I also don't remember the stop-time riffs in the song either.

Amazon sound sample

PhysicsDan
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#22 Post by PhysicsDan » Thu Oct 19, 2006 11:28 am

Yeah, I got word that the song is Bird and Diz on "Dizzy Atmosphere".

I think the CD I have: "The World of CP on Ember"


or http://tinyurl.com/yxpq84

has the titles for DA and Conf. switched. I'm not sure which version the song in question is, but if/when I get it figured out, I'll post. Regardless, I have it on good authority that the song in question is B&D, "Dizzy Atmosphere"

On a related note, a GREAT Dizzy album is "School Days" - it's a favorite of mine, just for all-round listening, as well as being pretty accessible to some dancers (although Reuben probably doesn't like it :)

For that matter, the World of CP on Ember is pretty accessible, too... although apparently, it may have some titles switched :)
In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it's the exact opposite.
-P. Dirac

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#23 Post by flyingcamel » Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:22 pm

gatorgal wrote:One of the other DJs here just recommended Best of Odyssey 1945 to 1952 to me... is anyone familiar with it?

Tina 8)
I love this album! I love Dizzy! This is a good compilation as it gets him in small groups, in big band and even with strings. Am I alone in that I love the "with strings" albums that were in vogue for a while?

In fact, I have even DJed two tunes off this Dizzy album and they both went over quite well: "On Sunny Side of the Street" and "School Days".

I realize the original post is not about swing or danceability, but these two really do swing. Don't you love finding jazz that works for dance outside the norm of the lindy canon?

And the Stuff Smith solo on Sunny is very tasty.

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#24 Post by CafeSavoy » Fri Apr 06, 2007 6:57 am

flyingcamel wrote:
gatorgal wrote:One of the other DJs here just recommended Best of Odyssey 1945 to 1952 to me... is anyone familiar with it?

Tina 8)
I love this album! I love Dizzy! This is a good compilation as it gets him in small groups, in big band and even with strings. Am I alone in that I love the "with strings" albums that were in vogue for a while?

In fact, I have even DJed two tunes off this Dizzy album and they both went over quite well: "On Sunny Side of the Street" and "School Days".

I realize the original post is not about swing or danceability, but these two really do swing. Don't you love finding jazz that works for dance outside the norm of the lindy canon?

And the Stuff Smith solo on Sunny is very tasty.
It seems like that compilation includes selections from "The Champ" and "School Days", two great albums that Dizzy produced on his own label. There are a couple of other tracks that you could play from those albums. If you haven't already, you might also want to check out the Joe Carroll albums, especially the one he did with Ray Bryant. He was one of the vocalists on those Dizzy tracks.

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#25 Post by JesseMiner » Fri Apr 06, 2007 9:52 am

CafeSavoy wrote:
flyingcamel wrote:In fact, I have even DJed two tunes off this Dizzy album and they both went over quite well: "On Sunny Side of the Street" and "School Days".

I realize the original post is not about swing or danceability, but these two really do swing. Don't you love finding jazz that works for dance outside the norm of the lindy canon?
It seems like that compilation includes selections from "The Champ" and "School Days", two great albums that Dizzy produced on his own label. There are a couple of other tracks that you could play from those albums. If you haven't already, you might also want to check out the Joe Carroll albums, especially the one he did with Ray Bryant. He was one of the vocalists on those Dizzy tracks.
I highly recommend these two albums as well (and Joe Carroll's solo albums too!). Both "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" and "School Days" have been quite popular in the Lindy Hop scene for years, and I play each regularly. Definitely my two favorite swinging Dizzy tunes.

Jesse

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